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Springboard to STEM
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Screenshot The goal of the Springboard to STEM program is "to increase student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and provide training and classroom materials for teachers." On this website, visitors can take advantage of free educational materials like worksheets, lesson plans, and discussion questions. Visitors need to fill out a form on the site before they can access all of the materials, but this only takes a minute or two. Moving on, the News and Links area contains links to their work around STEM education and the project's Twitter feed. The Marketplace is another great feature of the site which contains links to high quality STEM-related resources, such as...
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Diode Laser
This resource, part of the Spectroscopy Lab Suite, illustrates the physics of a semiconductor Diode Laser. Students can create conduction and valence band...
The Blue Brain Project
The Lausanne, Switzerland-based Blue Brain Project has been building a virtual brain in a supercomputer for over a decade. And while the task seems almost...
Scratch
Brought to the world by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group and the MIT Media Lab, Scratch allows children to program their own interactive stories, games, and...
Zoology
With 29 zoology-related activities, comics, quizzes, games, book lists, and other sundry tidbits, the Zoology section of the American Museum of Natural...
The Huntington: Garden Programs
The Huntington, which is located in San Marino, California, is unusual among cultural institutions for its scope. Including a library, an assortment of art...



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AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Large thunderstorm from 30,000 feet.
Sheet of mathematic formulas.
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Bruises start out looking red because of hemoglobin, the pigment in red blood cells. As blood pools under the skin, light striking the hemoglobin bounces back and bends through many skin layers, making the bruise look blue, black, or purple.


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