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Environmental Ethics Case Studies
The American Physiological Society (APS) has created a wide range of teaching resources through its collaborative digital library over the past several years. This particular corner of the site brings together a number of environmental ethics case studies which cover everything from GMOS to the fluoridation of drinking water. Currently, the site contains a dozen different resources, including "Food Aid and Population Control," "Reviving Extinct Species," and "Progress vs. Family Tradition." Resources can be filtered by Grade/Age level or even Pedagogy. Additionally, users are encouraged to craft their own resources and submit them for possible inclusion.
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John Heeley's Masterclass
Jonny Heeley, a British math teacher, has been featured in The Guardian, and recordings of his masterclasses can be found around the Internet. It's easy to see...
National Education Association:...
This resource list from retired middle school teacher Phil Nast is packed with links to map-related resources around the web. Here educators will find links to...
Institute of Physics: Education
The Institute of Physics (IOP), which boasts a worldwide membership of over 50,000, has put together an excellent Education section on its website. Here...
Codecademy School Computer Science...
Codecademy can be useful to educators in at least two ways. First, the site does a nice job of teaching beginners to code in HTML, Python, Java, and other...
For educators who are looking for ways to communicate the excitement and discovery that accompany classes and careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and...

AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Sheet of mathematic formulas.
Tools of Geometry.
A dense ball packs more mass in the same volume, so it has more momentum at any given velocity. Thus a dense ball travels further because it loses a smaller proportion of its kinetic energy to the surrounding fluid.

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