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Vickers Microindentation Hardness...
This learning activity will provide an introduction to using Vickers microindentation hardness profiling for pre-fabricated aluminum joints. This exercise allows students to calibrate a Vickers microindentation hardness tester, to measure hardness profiles across, and to use computer software to plot the correlation between strength and hardness in the materials. This module is intended for upper-level and advanced undergraduates and can be done in three one-hour class periods. The document is available to download in PDF file format.
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The Center for the Advancement of...
The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) is a non-profit organization that was founded in 2011 to manage the International Space Station. In...
National Geographic Education: The...
How does the sun determine the Earth's seasons? This is the question that the National Geographic Education site seeks to answer with a lively 35-minute...
Solstice and Equinox ("Suntrack")... PDF
These instructions for building a "suntrack" model were originally designed by Philip and Deborah Scherrer of the Stanford Solar Center in 2005; a decade later...
NASA Women of STEM
NASA Women of STEM is a wonderful site dedicated to celebrating women who have made contributions to NASA in the related fields of science, technology,...
The Rise of the Mammals
The Cenozoic Era, which began 65 million years ago and continues to the present, is also known as the Age of the Mammals, and it is the period in which...



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Veterinary surgeon examining a dog.
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Tornadoes release a boat load of energy, a tornado with wind speeds of 200 mph releases kinetic energy at the rate of 1 billion watts -- equal to the electric output of a pair of large nuclear reactors.


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