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Topic in Depth - Data Mining

This Topic in Depth explores data mining, also known as knowledge discovery in databases. Data mining is used to extract implicit, previously unknown, but potentially useful information from raw data. It is a blend of three main subjects: statistics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning.
Data Mining Technology
This website provides a basic overview of Data Mining and some applications for the process. The site lists some typical tasks addressed by data mining, such...
Data Mining and Machine Learning
Common applications of data mining include fraud detection and marketing, but data mining has also been applied in paleoecology, and medical genetics as...
Center for Intelligent Information...
This website from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst describes a project involving the development of new algorithms that will be applied to the creation...
SuperQuery: Data Mining for...
This white paper provides a nice educational resource for data mining. It includes a basic overview of data mining, descriptions of what a pattern is...
Weka Machine Learning Project
If you are inspired to try the process, the Weka Machine Learning Project from Waikato University offers open source software that can be used for data mining...
KDnuggets News: Data Mining and...
KD Nuggets posts articles on Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Genomic Mining, Web Mining that range from the serious to the silly, along with other resources....



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