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Sands
In this activity from Hagerstown Community College, students examine sand samples from various locations around the world. Using a hand lens and dissecting microscope, students will compare the size, shape, and color of the grains that make up the different sand samples, as well as looking for fossils, gems, and other minerals that sand often contains. This lesson includes activity directions as well as two variations of a student activity worksheet.
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The Wright Group
The Wright research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison presents its research using "narrow frequency distribution of tunable laser sources to gain...
Go Botany: Discover thousands of...
These Teaching Tools from Go Botany, an online arm of the New England Wild Flower Society, will bolster the lesson plans of educators working with "students...
Statistical Applets: One Variable...
This applet graphs histograms and stemplots. It additionally calculates measures of center and measures of spread for data sets from the text "Practice of...
Climate Program Office: Outreach...
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Program Office hosts an information-packed Outreach and Education website. Here readers may find...
Infrared Detector Spectroscopy
This resource, part of the Spectroscopy Lab Suite, simulates optical transitions in a pumped infrared detector. In this simulated experiment, impurity states...



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AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
The underbelly of a mushroom.
Radar screen showing land outlines and blips.
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John Tukey (1915-2000) applied mathematical and theoretical statistics to a variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. In addition, he is credited with coining the word "bit," a contraction of "binary digit."


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