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View Resource NOAA Tides Online

Access weather and water level observations for stations across coastal United States and the Great Lakes. Follow the "CO-OPS Website" link for tide predictions, additional weather-related observations, publications, and much more. Historical data is available for download. Site provides emergency information when a station's water level exceeds normal and is activated into Storm Surge mode.

View Resource National Ocean Service

NOS measures and predicts coastal and ocean phenomena, protects large areas of the oceans, and works to ensure safe navigation. Educator information includes Discovery Kits, which consist of 4 different classroom units on corals, estuaries, geodesy, and tides and water levels, Discovery Stories, 2 case studies concerning the Exxon Valdez incident and the lionfish invasion occurring along the U.S....

View Resource Great Ocean Conveyor Belt: Part I

The oceans are in constant flux. The movement of ocean water is readily observable in the rise and fall of the tides and the continual lapping of waves along the coastlines of continents and islands. Less obvious is the network of currents that constantly circulates ocean water from one side of the globe to another. This map illustrates the network of currents known as the great ocean conveyor...

View Resource Astronomy Animations

This collection of animations introduces students to planetary motions, gravitational effects, and the scale of astronomical distances. Students can view visualizations of Earth's changing seasons, circumpolar motion, and the celestial equator and ecliptic plane. Animations on gravity explain how satellites orbit, the motions of comets and meteor storms, and gravitational 'warping'. Other...

View Resource Great Ocean Conveyor Belt: Part II

A network of currents called the Great Ocean Conveyor constantly circulates the water in Earth's oceans and redistributes heat from the tropics toward the poles, keeping some regions far more habitable than they would be otherwise. In this audio segment, scientists discuss the hypothesis that global warming is introducing fresh water into the world's oceans, disrupting the Great Ocean Conveyor....

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