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View Resource Who's on First: A Relative Dating Activity

In this activity, students are introduced to sequencing and geologic time through relative dating techniques. Students begin by categorizing cards of nonsense words, then move on to cards with pictures of fossils. Once students begin to grasp "relative" dating, they can extend their knowledge of geologic time by exploring radiometric dating and developing a timeline of Earth's history. There is a...

View Resource Life Has A History

This website provides students with an introduction to the history of life and how it resulted in today's biodiversity. There are three tiers of difficulty available for different grade levels. During this tour students learn about geologic time, fossils, ancestral relationships, cladograms, variation, natural selection, and extinction. Students learn that life has been around for a very long...

View Resource The Mississippi River Delta

For the past 100 million years, redeposited sediment has gradually increased the size of the Mississippi River Delta. But over the past several decades, the coast of southern Louisiana has been losing rather than gaining land. This interactive feature illustrates how river management practices and severe weather events, including Hurricane Katrina, dramatically changed the size and shape of the...

View Resource Deep Time: The Geologic Time Scale

This page examines the issues involved in teaching students about the geologic time scale. There are suggestions for tackling troublesome issues in class as well as activities that can be used to clarify how geoscientists look at deep time. Five main concepts with which students struggle when thinking about Deep Time are addressed here: imagining or comprehending big numbers; the difference...

View Resource Fossils, Rocks, and Time

This on-line book, published by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), discusses the use of fossils in determining the age of rocks. The publication covers how to place events in correct temporal order, a description of the geologic time scale, the use of fossils to indicate rock ages, the law of fossil succession, index fossils, and radioactive dating.

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