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View Resource The Great 1906 Earthquake, 100 years later

This collection of resources is intended to commemorate the centennial of the Great 1906 Earthquake that destroyed much of San Francisco. Items include maps, books and articles, photos and video, field trip ideas, interactive features, and simulations. Of particular interest is 'Putting Down Roots in Earthquake Country', a general interest publication that provides information about earthquake...

View Resource This Dynamic Planet: World Map of Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Impact Craters, and Plate Tectonics

This map shows Earth's tectonic features, volcanoes, earthquakes, and impact craters. Smaller inset maps are included to depict the North and South Poles. The back of the map provides additional information, highlighting examples of fundamental processes; and providing text, timelines, references, and other resources to enhance understanding. The main and polar maps feature online interactive...

View Resource EarthScope: Earthquake in Tonga

This bulletin discusses the magnitude 7.9 earthquake that shook the islands of Tonga in May 2006. Topics include the tectonic setting of the islands, at the boundary of the Pacific and Australian plates, the frequent seismic activity at this location, how earthquakes are produced at subduction zones, and how they can reveal information about the Earth's interior. There is also information about...

View Resource Earthquakes: Los Angeles

Although the San Andreas Fault is the longest and one of the most active fault zones in California, it is not responsible for every earthquake in the state. This video segment describes the geologic setting of the San Andreas fault and a network of other active faults, particularly thrust faults, closer to Los Angeles, and explains why these may present a greater danger to the city than the San...

View Resource Tectonic Plates, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes

According to theory of plate tectonics, Earth is an active planet -- its surface is composed of many individual plates that move and interact, constantly changing and reshaping Earth's outer layer. Volcanoes and earthquakes both result from the movement of tectonic plates. This interactive feature shows the relationship between earthquakes and volcanoes and the boundaries of tectonic plates. By...

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