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View Resource Water Use: Tragedy in the Owens River Valley

These lessons help students develop a better understanding of the importance of well-managed water use while exploring the concepts of a watershed, land use, aquifers, and water engineering. The material focuses on the historical water use decision affecting the Owens River Valley in California. Materials lists, procedures, assessment recommendations, and extension ideas are provided. Links to...

View Resource Flood: Farming and Erosion

Farmers and rivers have a close, though not always friendly, relationship with one another. Rivers can create prized farmland, but they also flood fields and the communities built alongside them. Farming practices may also contribute to an increase in the magnitude and intensity of river flooding. This video segment explains the issue of flooding as seen in the Mississippi River watershed and...

View Resource Brooker Creek Watershed

This case study about the environmental challenges facing a watershed in Florida can serve as a model for a watershed module. The study covers all aspects of the watershed, including its geography and hydrology, land use and population, plants and animals, as well as challenges to the quality of the watershed now appearing due to development and use of water from the watershed's streams and...

View Resource Appalachian Laboratory

Located in Frostburg, Maryland, AL conducts research in aquatic ecology, landscape and watershed ecology, conservation biology and restoration ecology, behavioral and evolutionary ecology, and study both freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of Maryland and other locations in the United States and the world. Site contains information regarding the facilities, faculty, on going research, education...

View Resource HACH Analysis

In this activity from ATEEC, students will use chemical monitoring methods to investigate water quality and sources. The parameters to be measured are "pH, alkalinity, chloride, sulfate, ammonia, total dissolved solids (or turbidity), hardness, phosphorus, nitrogen, and temperature. These measurements will indicate whether the water is from garden runoff, a stream or pond, or a pool. This...

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