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View Resource A Study of Demographic and Economic-Based Explanations For Variation In Street Robbery Rates In U.S.

Researchers studying crime suggest that there is substantial variation in the amount of serious crime across large urban jurisdictions such as central cities. There have been many attempts to account for crime variation. The following raises questions about how populations may be linked with crime variation. One key component of serious crimes involves those that are conceptualized as being...

View Resource Social Structure, Race/Ethnicity, and Homocide

As discussed, the murder rates for Blacks in the United States are substantially higher than those for Whites, with Latino murder rates falling in the middle. These differences have existed throughout the 20th and into the 21st century and, with few exceptions, are found in different sections of the United States. Although biological and genetic explanations for racial differences in crime rates,...

View Resource Population Structures and Cohorts

This module provides a gentle introduction to the use of StudentChip software and census data to investigate basic population issues. In the first part of this module, you will use data from the 1990 U.S. census to create population pyramids for several racial and ethnic groups. These population pyramids provide the ability to view the age and sex structure of a population. They not only allow us...

View Resource The Social Structures of the Cities

This activity, created by Jim Wright of the University of Central Florida, provides a look at the urban structure of cities through the eyes of statistics. Objectives of this first data exercise are: to discover how the present-day United States population is distributed across these various census categories; to discover how the distribution has changed over time; and, to see how some of the...

View Resource World Development Chart

This scatterplot, created by Gapminder, Inc., lets users plot a number of demographic variables and see the log transformation of those variables for numerous countries and income groups. Users can also see the information for any year from 1800 to projected information to 2030. The graph is interactive by nature. It allows users to easily set different limits and then see how the graph...

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