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View Resource MY NASA DATA : Hurricanes As Heat Engines Lesson

This lesson is designed to help students gain knowledge in using the MY NASA DATA Live Access Server (LAS) to specify and download a microset of data, then to use the data to create graphs to explore how hurricanes extract heat energy from the ocean surface. Students will make graphs from the data microset, then use the graphs to investigate locations along the track of Hurricane Rita where...

View Resource Jetstream: Online School for Weather

Produced by the National Weather Service, this site offers a comprehensive introduction to weather and weather safety and includes numerous lesson plans suitable for high school use. Topics include the atmosphere, ocean, synoptic meteorology, thunderstorms, lightning, and remote sensing.

View Resource The Non-Tornado Home Page

This page features examples of tornado look-alikes and illusions which are not tornadoes. Each photo is accompanied by a title that discloses what the feature really is and a brief description written by storm chasers or weather experts giving hints on how to discern real tornadoes from the look-alikes. Examples include precipitation shafts and cores, downbursts, non-rotating low clouds, a...

View Resource Royal Meteorological Society

The Royal Meteorological Society is the national society for all those whose profession or interests are in any way connected with meteorology or related subjects. Site features the latest news, information, publications, and events all revolving around this global meteorological resource. Learn about METLink, RMetS flagship weather project where participants around the world exchange weather...

View Resource Animation of 2006 Ozone Hole

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) polar-obriting satellites monitor the ozone levels around the globe. The ozone layer acts to protect life on Earth by blocking harmful ultraviolet rays from the sun. The "ozone hole" is a severe depletion of the ozone layer high above Antarctica. It is primarily caused by human-produced compounds that release chlorine and bromine gases...

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