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View Resource A Cool Glass of Water

This case study uses the example of ice in fresh and salt water- in which type of water would ice melt more quickly? The lesson helps students explore the concepts of density, heat transfer, conduction and convection. This material would be appropriate for upper level high school or lower level undergraduate classes. The case study and teaching notes may be downloaded in PDF format. The site also...

View Resource Conduction Activities

This page presents activities related to Conduction from the Science & Engineering in the Lives of Students project. Activities include Chemical Reactions in Construction, Everyday Heat Transfer, Heat Resistant Glass, Hot Cup, Speed Melting, and Wall R Value. Each activity includes a detailed description, list of the materials needed, science concepts covered, and reflection questions.

View Resource Science & Engineering in the Lives of Students: Activity Gallery

This page presents the collected activities from the Science & Engineering in the Lives of Students project. Activities present topics including bending and torque, conduction, convection, distribution, engineering design, generation, radiation, shear, tension and compression and usage and safety. This is a great place to start when browsing the different activities available from the SELS...

View Resource Solar Ovens-Understanding Energy Transfer

This lesson, presented by the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, covers the concept of solar ovens. In this lesson, students will learn how "thermal energy flows from the hot air to the cold water via conduction and will indicate that this would continue to happen until the water sample reaches the same temperature as the oven air. The students will also answer questions about how...

View Resource R-Factor

The amount of energy used in a home is greatly impacted by the type of materials used in constructing the home. In particular, the thermal conductivity of the materials will affect how quickly heat is allowed to enter or leave the home. In this hands-on activity, students will measure the ability of various materials to resist heat flow (R-factor) by placing a light bulb inside boxes made of the...

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