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View Resource NASA Earth Observatory Mission: Biomes

This fun, interactive website was designed by NASA's earth observatory to introduce students to the Earth's Biomes. A biome, as defined by the site, is "a community of plants and animals living together in a certain kind of climate." This website provides links to seven different biomes that students can learn about including coniferous forests, grasslands, and tundras. Each separate biome page...

View Resource Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Most visitors to the Smithsonian Institution's museums in Washington, DC may not be aware of the activities of their Tropical Research Institute, which may have something to do with the fact that it is located in Panama. The Institute's history stretches back to the early years of the 20th century, when one of its prime directives was to survey the flora and fauna of the area for the purpose of...

View Resource NASA Earth Observatory: Escape from the Amazon

As part of NASA's Earth Observatory, visitors to the Escape from the Amazon Web site are invited to "Accompany NASA scientists as they explore our world and unravel the mysteries of climate and environmental change." The Escape from the Amazon feature focuses on the buildup of carbon dioxide and its effect on global climate change, and the role that forests play in reversing this trend. A really...

View Resource Global Canopy Programme

Working high above the ground below, researchers who study forest canopies work together on a number of unique scientific endeavors, including tracking the flora and fauna of these unique ecosystems. The Global Canopy Programme is an alliance of 29 scientific institutions interested in exploring "the range and economic value of forest ecosystem services and to share [their] findings with...

View Resource Potential Effects of Amazon Deforestation on Tropical Climate

This report describes the results of a study in which climate modeling was used to examine the effects of deforestation in the Amazon basin. The study concluded that changes in land surface properties (loss of forest cover) cause changes in the mean surface wind stress in the tropical Pacific, which in turn results in increased variability of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events.

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