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View Resource Hardy Microbe Thrives at pH 0

This article reports that a team of geomicrobiologists has detected a new microbe, called Ferroplasma acidarmanus, surviving in some of the most acidic waters on Earth - a seemingly impossible pH near 0. That makes this critter, a member of the microbial kingdom Archaea, one of a few record-setting microbes that can survive in conditions usually toxic to life as we know it. A subscription to...

View Resource Global Climate Change: A Glance in the Rear View Mirror

This Geotimes article provides information regarding the inference of paleoclimate (global climate change) from proxy data such as ice core (oxygen isotope) records and biota found in deep sea sediments. The article discusses the history of proxy usage, the basis of current proxies, and gaps in our understanding of carbon/material cycling and climate records.

View Resource Geomicrobiology of Vostok Ice: Implications for Life in Lake Vostok

This abstract introduces newly discovered microbe assemblages within Lake Vostok and the research it has inspired. Current studies hope to gain insight into the following areas: physical stresses in deep glacial and accretion ice; the role of clathrates on gas dynamics within the lake; the origin of microbes in accretion ice; the physiological state of ice-bound microbes; the geochemistry of the...

View Resource Phytoplankton Productivity

This laboratory activity, from the University of Toronto, provides a short introduction to measuring changes in dissolved oxygen and measuring primary productivity using 14C. The 14C-radiotracer method is used to measure the assimilation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) by phytoplankton as an estimate of the rate of photosynthetic production of organic matter in the euphotic zone.

View Resource Extremophilic Bacteria and Microbial Diversity

This online enhancement chapter of Raven and Johnson's Biology, a textbook for undergraduate majors, examines the many prokaryotic organisms that inhabit "extreme environments"–habitats in which some chemical or physical variable(s) differ significantly from that found in habitats that support plant and animal life. Topics include using new molecular techniques to discover more about bacteria; ...

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