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Generation A and Bee Extinction...
This resource, created by Paul T. Gallagher of Red Rocks Community College, will invite students to consider the decline in bee population in countries around the world. Students will read Generation A by Douglas Coupland outside of class and use this book as background information for the activity. The activity requires six hours to complete - three class meetings researching and creating presentations. This three page pdf document contains directions for the teacher, student outcomes, and guidelines for creating a grading rubric.
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Frontiers for Young Minds
STEM teachers and students (as well as anyone who enjoys learning about science but dislikes reading traditional journal articles) may be interested in...
Canada's Changing Climate Report
In April 2019, the government of Canada released its first major report in an ongoing national assessment that was led by Natural Resources Canada. The report...
New England Aquarium: Climate...
Science teachers may be interested in this collection of classroom resources provided by the New England Aquarium in Boston. The main feature of this collection...
NOAA Ocean Explorer: Windows to the...
Those curious about deep ocean research may want to check out the current expedition of Okeanos Explorer, the research ship of the National Oceanic and...
World Ocean Radio
Interested in learning more about ocean issues, but short on time? Then World Ocean Radio may be for you. Launched in 2010, World Ocean Radio is a weekly...



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AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Blue lab flasks.
Butterfly perched on a flower.
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Bruises start out looking red because of hemoglobin, the pigment in red blood cells. As blood pools under the skin, light striking the hemoglobin bounces back and bends through many skin layers, making the bruise look blue, black, or purple.


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