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Burke Museum Department & Collections
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Screenshot With this Web site, users may access free resources based on the nationally ranked collections of the Burke Museum at the University of Washington. Over 5 million specimens are to be found in four areas: anthropology, botany, geology, and zoology. Online resources linked to the zoology collections include a guide to the herpetofauna of Washington, two mammals databases, and a fun section on spider myths. Likewise, records from the Museum's botany collections, housed at the University of Washington Herbarium, may be perused using the WTU Herbarium Database.
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Discovery Education: Introduction...
This lesson plan from Discovery Education delivers an Introduction To Bacteria over the course of three class periods. Adhering to National Science Education...
Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden:...
For decades, the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden (FTBG) has been "exploring, explaining, and conserving the world of tropical plants." Educators unable to...
iKeepSafe: Educators
As the world moves more and more toward a computerized and networked workflow, cybersecurity is quickly becoming an essential skill. This site, from the...
Skepticism 101
Skepticism 101, the Skeptical Studies Curriculum Resource Center from Skeptic magazine, provides reams of resources built to inspire a critical, even aporetic,...
Mars Science Laboratory
This excellent site from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) takes readers on a journey to the Red Planet through an assortment of images, videos, and highly...



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AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Laboratory tubes and dropper.
The Andromeda Galaxy and companion galaxies.
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A rough ball will travel further than smooth one. Roughness, whether from stitching or abrasion, creates a layer of turbulent air that greatly reduces drag. A smooth golf ball would fly only about half as far as the normal dimpled variety.


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