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Open Source Physics
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The Open Source Physics Project creates and distributes curricular material for physics education and computational physics. Java code libraries, example applications, and learning resources such as interactive explorations, exercises, and tutorials are all available. Open Source Physics projects include curriculum for computational physics and statistical physics, video analysis software, and upper division physics courses. The website is supported by the National Science Foundation.
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National Geographic Education: The...
How does the sun determine the Earth's seasons? This is the question that the National Geographic Education site seeks to answer with a lively 35-minute...
Solstice and Equinox ("Suntrack")... PDF
These instructions for building a "suntrack" model were originally designed by Philip and Deborah Scherrer of the Stanford Solar Center in 2005; a decade later...
NASA Women of STEM
NASA Women of STEM is a wonderful site dedicated to celebrating women who have made contributions to NASA in the related fields of science, technology,...
The Rise of the Mammals
The Cenozoic Era, which began 65 million years ago and continues to the present, is also known as the Age of the Mammals, and it is the period in which...
GlobalFIA
This site by GlobalFia provides a tutorial on the general aspects of flow injection analysis (FIA), sequential injection analysis (SIA) and the newly coined...



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AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
3D visualization of a Virus / Bacterium.
Butterfly perched on a flower.
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John Tukey (1915-2000) applied mathematical and theoretical statistics to a variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. In addition, he is credited with coining the word "bit," a contraction of "binary digit."


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