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MIT OpenCourseWare
With MIT OpenCourseWare, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology plans to make course materials for nearly all its undergraduate and graduate subjects available online, free of charge to anyone who cares to use them. An ambitious project created as part of the university's mission "to advance knowledge and education to best serve the nation and the world." MIT OpenCourseWare currently offers course materials for a wide range of subjects. Users should bear in mind that MIT OpenCourseWare is an informal learning venue only, not a degree or certificate-granting program.
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Skepticism 101
Skepticism 101, the Skeptical Studies Curriculum Resource Center from Skeptic magazine, provides reams of resources built to inspire a critical, even aporetic,...
Mars Science Laboratory
This excellent site from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) takes readers on a journey to the Red Planet through an assortment of images, videos, and...
UCI Exploring the Cosmos: Lecture...
As this illuminating history of the Martian canals controversy notes, when sky gazers began examining the planets through telescopes in the seventeenth century...
ChemCam on Mars
In the past several years, news outlets have come alive with more and more information about the past and present of Mars. The source of much of that...
Crash Course Kids
Crash Course Kids is a YouTube video series designed to make science accessible and exciting for late elementary school students. The site opens with a...

AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Falling water.
Sunflowers in a Kansas field.
There is a difference between a billion in a America and a billion in Great Britain. In the U.S., a billion equals one thousand million. In Great Britain, a billion equals a million million.

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