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Liftoff Lab
This document, created by Pennsylvania State University and hosted by the Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge Network, serves as a guide for a laboratory activity where students are introduced to the liftoff process and asked to "determine the influence using a liftoff photoresist has on feature quality by analyzing data obtained throughout the experiment." The lab guide includes objectives, background on the liftoff process, step-by-step directions to the lab activity itself, including links to demonstration videos, and post-lab questions to test student comprehension. In order to access and download this material, users must complete a free registration.
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Teach Online Safety
According to a report by the Pew Research Center published in late 2014, the frequency and severity of cyber attacks are increasing quickly - and they are...
Virtual Textbook of Organic...
William H. Reusch, emeritus professor at Michigan State University, published his Introduction to Organic Chemistry in 1977. Readers may purchase it for a list...
A Simple Plan: E.L. Trudeau, the...
The University at Buffalo's National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science is a well-known resource in the promotion, development, and dissemination of case...
This excellent, interactive site, which won a Webby Award and an award from the American Association of School Librarians, takes students on a journey - into...
NREL: Workforce Development &...
The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has assembled an impressive array of educational resources for teachers working with elementary, middle, and...

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AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Scientist observing cell culture through a microscope.
A slide used for specimens.
The cells of an onion contain sulphuric compounds and other enzymes. When you cut into an onion, they mix, forming sulfenic acids, which in turn becomes a gas. It is that gas that irritates your eyes.

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