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Topic in Depth - Bird Migration (10)

The songs of spring are in the air when migrating birds grace the skies, making regular seasonal journeys in response to alterations in weather, habitat, and food availability. The following websites cover various aspects of the amazing and ancient phenomenon of bird migration.


 
Migration of Birds
 
Hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center, this site is an online publication from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on the Migration of Birds. This publication provides an extensive account of migration including sections on Techniques for Studying Migration, Evolution of...

 
Migration Ecology
 
This site from the University of Lund, Sweden, introduces various research studies in the field of Migration Ecology including research information on "Orientation and navigation," "Flight," "Migration patterns," and "Energetics." The mission of the group is "to forward, by research and teaching, the understanding of...

 
Canadian Migration Monitoring Network
 
This site presents the Canadian Migration Monitoring Network, a standardized effort involving multiple stations in southern Canada and the northern United States to gather baseline data on northern breeding birds. Site visitors can link to information about species population trends, latest sightings, and to sites for...

 
Bald Eagle
 
Journey North hosts this site, which tracks migrating bald eagles through the spring of 2004, providing migration updates, information about tracking bald eagle migration, and related educational lessons and activities. These activities include tracking eagle migrations, eagle characteristics, reproduction, food, and...

 
Crane Cam: Live Streaming Video of Sandhill Crane Migration
 
A National Geographic feature, Crane Cam provides multimedia shows, a photo gallery, map, and viewings from a live remote camera at Audubon's Rowe Sanctuary. While the live broadcast has ended, visitors can still access the information about cranes and view highlights from the footage that was captured. Requires...

 
North American Migration Flyways
 
This site from birdnature.com is a webpage describing the migratory bird Flyway Systems of North America accompanied by clearly labeled maps. The flyways include the Atlantic, the Mississippi, the Central, and Pacific. Each section details the finer points of the flyway and the birds that use it.

 
The Migration Game
 
This site features an interactive Migration Game created by the Migratory Bird Center at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park. In it, you can help Wanda the Wood Thrush travel from her winter home in Costa Rica to her summer home in Maryland by answering questions regarding migration in general and specific...

 
Miracle of Winged Migration
 
This site, from the Why Files contains brief sections on various aspects of bird migration such as navigation, flight strategies, raptor migration, and declining numbers of migrating songbirds. This site also links to information about monarch migration and the effects of global warming on migration of birds and...

 
Spring Migration
 
The Spring Migration site from eNature.com and the National Wildlife Federation provides an online reference for bird enthusiasts that shows the dates that each species can be expected to return to its summer habitat. Site visitors can choose from a large number of species found in their range. Maps show summer and...

 
The North American Breeding Bird Survey
 
Established in 1966, the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) was created in order to track the status and trends of North American bird populations. Drawing on the resources of the United States Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and the Canadian Wildlife Service's National Wildlife Research...


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