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Liftoff Lab
This document, created by Pennsylvania State University and hosted by the Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge Network, serves as a guide for a laboratory activity where students are introduced to the liftoff process and asked to "determine the influence using a liftoff photoresist has on feature quality by analyzing data obtained throughout the experiment." The lab guide includes objectives, background on the liftoff process, step-by-step directions to the lab activity itself, including links to demonstration videos, and post-lab questions to test student comprehension. In order to access and download this material, users must complete a free registration.
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UCI Exploring the Cosmos: Lecture...
As this illuminating history of the Martian canals controversy notes, when sky gazers began examining the planets through telescopes in the seventeenth century,...
ChemCam on Mars
In the past several years, news outlets have come alive with more and more information about the past and present of Mars. The source of much of that...
Crash Course Kids
Crash Course Kids is a YouTube video series designed to make science accessible and exciting for late elementary school students. The site opens with a...
Science NetLinks: Afterschool...
Educators who facilitate after school programs will find a wealth of resources for late elementary and middle schoolers on this American Association for the...
Whales: Free Lesson Plans
This lesson plan from Discovery Education explores the underwater world of whales. Designed for grades six through eight, the plan is divided into sections,...

AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Periodic Table.
The Andromeda Galaxy and companion galaxies.
Throughout the years, people have used computers in attempts to find the most accurate number for pi possible. The number for pi has been calculated with over one billion digits.

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