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The Dynamic Earth
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The reason we know that glaciers covered certain areas of the globe while continental plates buckled elsewhere is because of rocks. Thanks to these gatekeepers of the past, we are better able to understand the earth's history and the present. The National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, offers this really interactive and engaging site to teach about science of the earth. The three main sections of the site include: Rocks at Earth's Surface, Rocks Below Earth's Surface, and Mining. The detailed interactive modules in each section take the visitor from learning about the different minerals that make up gneiss, granite, and feldspar, to touring three mines in the United...
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Dolphin Deaths: A Case Study in...
The National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, which is housed at the University of Buffalo, is a National Science Foundation-sponsored, award-winning...
Khan Academy: What is Coronary...
For readers who would like a crash course in coronary artery disease, this site from the Khan Academy is a great option. Taught in 12- to 15-minute sections,...
Vox: Common Core math, explained...
The Scout Report doesn't usually review three-minute videos, but this one from Vox is worth it. First, because the video itself explains in sharp detail the...
Bielefeld Academic Search Engine...
The Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE) is a freely accessible academic search engine that accesses over 70 million documents to find readers what they're...
edX: Introduction to Computer...
The online MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) mogul, edX, takes popular courses from some of the best universities in the world and adapts them for home...



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AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
The Great Pyramid at Chichen Itza, Mexico.
Falling water.
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The AMSER Quarterly was recently featured on Maria Anderson's Teaching College Math blog. Maria Anderson is a math instructor at Muskegon Community College, to read her math blog as well as her contribution to the Quarterly click here. For more issues of the AMSER Quarterly click here.


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