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High School Level Nanotechnology...
This page of experiments is provided by Nano4Me.org, a product of the National Center for Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK Center) which is based at the Penn State College of Engineering and is funded through the National Science Foundation's Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program. This page includes instructions and lab sheets for two experiments on silver nanoparticles, as well as an article on microencapsulation, and are intended for use by high school educators. These resources, along with all resources from the NACK Center, require a fast, easy, free log-in to access the materials.
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Fogarty International Center:...
Assembled by the Fogerty International Center at the National Institutes of Health, this page of resources designed for teachers of bioethics can be useful to...
NSTA: Freebies for Science Teachers
With new resources being added almost daily, this page from the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) is worth bookmarking for science educators of all...
Nano: For K-12 Teachers
As this informative page from the United States National Nanotechnology Initiative notes, there is an ongoing debate in STEM circles about how to teach...
The Molecularium Project
The Molecularium seeks to "excite audiences of all ages to explore and understand the molecular nature of the world around them." Based at the Rensselaer...
John Heeley's Masterclass
Jonny Heeley, a British math teacher, has been featured in The Guardian, and recordings of his masterclasses can be found around the Internet. It's easy to see...

AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Total eclipse of the sun, computer generated.
Bright yellow-green moss growing on a dead tree branch.
Statisticians are needed for estimating the safety and studying the economics of nuclear power plants and alternative energy sources (at a utility company, research laboratory, the Nuclear Regulatory commission, or the Department of Energy).

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