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Spongelab: Build-A-Body
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Screenshot Are you curious about how the human body works? If so, the Build-A-Body site may pique your interest in the world of the body's organ systems. The site features a drag and drop game where players are tasked with assembling an organ system and making their way through the nervous, skeletal, excretory, and reproductive systems. The site also contains a set of case studies about the various conditions that each system may encounter over the lifespan. The site is a fine tool for teaching basic concepts of human physiology and anatomy.
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Etch Processes for Microsystems -...
This YouTube video, created by Southwest Center for Microsystems Education (SCME), provides an introduction to etch processes used in microsystems. The...
Systems of Two Equations:...
This is the second topic in the Systems of Two Equations section of the series of lessons on math provided by DeafTEC. Gary Blatto-Vallee, a math and science...
English Resources
In this section, DeafTEC provides a series of teaching resources on English, rhetoric, and writing. Specifically, the Writing in the Disciplines (WID)...
Renewable Energy Projects for the... PDF
This 72 page pdf from Illinois Valley Community College contains a variety of activities related to renewable energy. They were "developed by middle...
Coordinates
In this activity, developed by the Lane Community College Geo-STAC program?, students "understand geographic location (absolute and relative) using an i...



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AMSER is a portal of educational resources and services built specifically for use by those in Community and Technical Colleges but free for anyone to use.

AMSER is funded by the National Science Foundation as part of the National Science Digital Library, and is being created by a team of project partners led by Internet Scout.
Science beakers filled with fluids and a measuring device.
Human red blood cells.
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A rough ball will travel further than smooth one. Roughness, whether from stitching or abrasion, creates a layer of turbulent air that greatly reduces drag. A smooth golf ball would fly only about half as far as the normal dimpled variety.


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